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Deutsche Bahn

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Investigators in Belgium are reporting that a Brussels Airlines Airbus A330-200 suffered a failure of both engines while en route from Kinshasa on 11 December.

The aircraft (OO-SFU) was at a cruising altitude of 40,000ft when the left engine, a Pratt & Whitney PW4000, failed. The flight crew quickly transmitted an urgent message to air traffic controllers while also considering the option to divert to Djerba, off the coast of Tunisia

The flight crew ultimately decided to continue on to Brussels. While on approach, the right-hand engine failed "several times," but relit automatically. Fortunately, the A330-200 landed safely with both engines operating. 

The Airbus widebody is an 18-year old airframe, delivered to Sabena in 2000 before going on to operate with Lufthansa, Swiss, and Air Australia. Brussels Airlines took delivery of the airframe in 2013. 


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Aviation Delight

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Scary with all these twin engine jets. I guess the chance of both engines failing is slim but there is still that chance. Give a tri-jet or a 747 any day. How many times have you heard of all 3 or 4 engines failing.
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definitely SCARY for those onboard! glad it landed safely.
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Deutsche Bahn

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aviation Delight
Scary with all these twin engine jets. I guess the chance of both engines failing is slim but there is still that chance. Give a tri-jet or a 747 any day. How many times have you heard of all 3 or 4 engines failing.


I suppose the chances are far slimmer than that of a twin. I know of dual-engine failures on a 747 and 707, but not three or more. I am also not aware of any case of a DC-10 or L-1011 losing all three engines. That doesn't mean it didn't or couldn't happen I reckon.  
 
Now I need to go look it up. My mind wants to know.

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Deutsche Bahn

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*** I've found once incident (sort of) involving a DC-10-30. I shall write it up and post the details tomorrow. ***



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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deutsche Bahn
*** I've found once incident (sort of) involving a DC-10-30. I shall write it up and post the details tomorrow. ***




Really did not know it happened. The only case I know of a 747 was a British Airways that had flown through volcanic ash. Which really was not the planes or engine fault.

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National Airlines Flight 27


Date: 3 November 1973

Summary: Uncontained Engine Failure

Location: En Route (Over New Mexico, USA)

Aircraft Type: McDonnell Douglas DC-10-10

Operator: National Airlines

Registration: N60NA

Aircraft Name: Barbara


Flight Origin: Miami International

1st Stopover: New Orleans International

2nd Stopover: Houston Intercontinental Airport

3rd Stopover: McCarran International Airport

Intended Destination: San Francisco International

Passengers: 116

Crew: 12

Injuries: 24

Fatalities: 1

Survivors: 127


Flight & Accident Details

At roughly 4:40 pm while cruising at an altitude of 12,000m (39,000 ft) and 65 miles southwest of Albuquerque, the No. 3 (Starboard) engine fan assembly disintegrated resulting in an uncontained engine failure. Engines No 1 and 2, as well as a portion of the right wing, was significantly damaged. Additionally, the starboard fuselage was severely damaged near seat 17H. 

[f1JKJz]

The passenger window and surrounding area near seat 17H failed, resulting in an explosive decompression. A single passenger, Mr. G.F. Gardner, was partially expelled from the aircraft, being held in place by his seatbelt. Despite significant effort exerted by a fellow passenger to pull Mr. Gardner back into the airliner, he was expelled from the DC-10 via the opening in the fuselage.

The situation in the cockpit was no less dire, as debris from the uncontained engine failure had not only damaged the remaining two engines, it had also caused a loss of vital electrical and hydraulic systems. The flight crew initiated an emergency descent and roughly 19 minutes later, managed to land the stricken DC-10 at Albuquerque International Sunport

Surviving passengers and crew evacuated the aircraft using the emergency slides. Of those, 24 were treated for smoke inhalation, external as well as inner ear injuries, minor abrasions, and burns. 

The New Mexico State Police and rescue personnel launched a massive effort to search for the missing passenger. Authorities even used computer analysis to predict possible trajectories. Despite their best efforts, Mr. Gardner's remains we never located. The search was eventually terminated, and the missing passenger declared deceased. 

Some two years later, a construction crew working on assembling the Very Large Array radio telescope in New Mexico, came across skeletal remains while on the job site. Authorities recovered the remains which were transported to Albuquerque where they underwent forensic testing to determine a possible identity. Approximately one year later, authorities finally managed to positively identify the remains as those belonging to the missing passenger, Mr. G.F. Gardner. 

The NTSB found that the crew of Flight 27 had conducted an unauthorized auto-throttle experiment prior to the engine failure by pulling the N1 circuit breakers. However, the NTSB was not able to definitively conclude whether the test directly or indirectly led to the failure of the No. 3 engine.

[IspuKI]


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